Curve Lake First Nation Councillor Keith Knott received a Certificate of Recognition Award from Warden, J. Murray Jones during the Peterborough County Council meeting for his years of dedicated service to his community and local region.

Curve Lake First Nation Councillor Keith Knott received a Certificate of Recognition Award from Warden, J. Murray Jones during the Peterborough County Council meeting for his years of dedicated service to his community and local region.

CURVE LAKE FN – Councillor Keith Knott is a well-known figure in the Peterborough area, both as an advocate for cultural equality for First Nations peoples and as an active volunteer in community projects throughout the region.

On June 5, Knott received a Certificate of Recognition Award from Warden J. Murray Jones during a Peterborough County Council meeting for his years of dedicated service to his community and the local region.

Councillor Knott started out as a community representative for the Recreation and Library Committee in 1968 and has remained a  leader of his home community since he was first elected as a Councillor in 1972. Councillor Knott is a former Chief of Curve Lake First Nation.  He first served from 1992 to 1996 and again in 2000 until 2012 when he opted to run for Councillor where he was elected head Councillor.

Knott has strong communication skills and sense of fairness, enabling him to bring about many important developments to the community such as the Community Centre, Small Business Centre and new waste management system.  Councillor Knott participated on various boards and committees over his 45 years of service including the former chair of the Peterborough County City Health Unit and continues to serve on the Ministry of Natural Resources’ Ontario Geographic Names Board of Directors since 2008.

His leadership ability came to the forefront when Councillor Knott took immediate action to support the Kashechwan evacuees during their stay in the Peterborough area in 2005. He influenced the provision of food, clothing and opportunities for socialization with community members from some of the Mississauga First Nations (Curve Lake, Hiawatha and Scugog).

Knott is devoted to his Anishnaabe heritage and caring husband to his wife, Bubbles of 55 years along with being a proud father of five daughters and a loving grandfather to eleven grandchildren. Together with Bubbles, Keith is currently in a pilot program for Anishnaabemowin at Trent University to keep the language alive and prospering.