Cover of "We are all Treaty People" depicting the Treaty of Niagara Wampum belt presentation in July 1764.  Book is available for purchase in English or French at www.goodminds.com

Cover of “We are all Treaty People” depicting the Treaty of Niagara Wampum belt presentation in July 1764. Book is available for purchase in English or French at www.goodminds.com

TORONTO, ON (JUNE 19, 2014) — Ontario Regional Chief Stan Beardy is wishing everyone an enjoyable National Aboriginal Day taking place June 21 and encourages all to not only take part in the cultural practices but to learn our shared history.

“On days like this, we need to better educate the general public about the history and Treaties made with the Indigenous peoples of this country,” said Regional Chief Stan Beardy. “For example, how many know that the summer of 2014 marks an important 250th anniversary of an event that formed Canada: the 1764 Treaty of Niagara?”

Raising public awareness on the First Nations’ history, rights and priorities is a part of the Chiefs of Ontario communications strategy and is paramount in the mandate given by First Nations. Unfortunately, Canada’s history books do not provide an accurate reflection of the First Nations’ experience and do not provide the necessary critical look at the creation of Canada. First Nations are calling for a better-rounded and less one-sided perspective.

“Ask a First Nations person about Canada’s history on National Aboriginal Day, they will kindly tell anyone with a sincere interest in learning more,” Regional Chief Beardy said.

Today, the Chiefs of Ontario and the Law Society of Upper Canada have partnered to bring together First Nation leadership, legal experts, and resource development industry representatives for an important discussion on the intersection of Treaty and resource development. This topic builds on the arguments that were put forth to the Supreme Court of Canada in the Keewatin case, which focuses on an issue in the First Nation community of Grassy Narrows but can potentially have an effect on all First Nation communities and their Treaty rights.

The event takes place today as part of the National Aboriginal Month Celebration at 4pm at the Law Society of Upper Canada in Toronto. More information can be obtained at: http://www.lawsocietygazette.ca/event/nahm/

The Chiefs of Ontario is a political forum and a secretariat for collective decision making, action, and advocacy for the 133 First Nation communities located within the boundaries of the province of Ontario, Canada.