Culture Archive

Chapman’s Gas Bar Christmas Craft Sale ‘booming’

By Rick Garrick FORT WILLIAM FIRST NATION—A variety of historical necklaces created by Wiikwemkoong’s Teresa Trudeau were among the arts and crafts on sale at Chapman’s Gas Bar Christmas Craft Sale in Fort William. “These are historical corn necklaces, and this one here with the leather included

Red Drum Motorcycle club raises awareness on National Day of Remembrance

By Kathleen Imbert WIKWEMIKOONG TERRITORY – Naandwechige-Gamig Wikwemikong Health Center’s lodge welcomed unexpected attenders to the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against women’s drumming and singing evening on Dec 6th.  The Red Drum Motorcycle club dressed in their full regalia, meaning their leathers, joined

Anishinaabay Inngohnigaywin

By Eli Baxter Anishinaabay Innagohnigaywin Indian Act Anishinaabay Innagohnigaywin kaween geeabachichigaatayzinoon. Anishinaabay Law was not used. Weenawa peewatayg ogeeozhitoonawaa. They, the visitors, are the ones who made it. Kaaween geenawind kikeeozitoozeemin. We did not make it. Weenawaa otibayndanawaa. They own it. Keenaween dush kiweendamagohmin aneen mayaam

Neechee Studio Illustration workshop a hit

By Rick Garrick THUNDER BAY – The Nov. 18 Neechee Studio Illustration workshop was a hit with a group of Fort William community members at Definitely Superior Art Gallery in Thunder Bay. “I loved it,” says Fort William’s Cindy Bannon. “It was relaxing, it was a good

Second edition of ‘Mile Post 104 and beyond’ creates a conversation for reconciliation

By Carrie MacKenzie KINGSTON – Robert P. Wells, the author of “Wawahte” is republishing his first novel, “Mile Post 104 and Beyond” which was originally published in 2015, by Trafford Press.  This moving and inspirational book tells the story of Wells’ life growing up in the Canadian

The Anishinawbe way of life depicted in paintings

By Barb Nahwegahbow TORONTO - “I have a great respect for Joseph Sagaj, he’s one of the best Anishnawbe artists we have,” said Elder Jim Dumont. Dumont was speaking last month at the unveiling of a series of seven paintings commissioned by the provincial Ministry of the

McKenzie brings something new to pow wows with fabric art

By Rick Garrick NORTH BAY - Fabric artist Robin McKenzie developed her unique style of fabric art about two-and-a-half years ago at the request of one of her hand drum bag customers. “I used to do drum bags for hand drums with my designs on the front,”

Showcasing Indigenous talents at Reconciliation Art Gala

By Kelly Anne Smith NORTH BAY – Jubilant patrons filled the Capitol Centre’s WKP Kennedy Gallery on opening night of the Indigenous Art Gala Teamwork makes the Dreamwork. Taking place November 1, Teamwork makes the Dreamwork honours Reconciliation North Bay’s One Year Anniversary. Created to celebrate a

Josephine Mandamin featured in new book ‘The Water Walker’

By Rick Garrick THUNDER BAY - The Water Walker children’s book featuring the story of Water Walker Josephine Mandamin was a hit during two school visits on Nov. 2 in Thunder Bay. “We saw 40 kids that were in Grade 2 and 3 this morning (at Nor’wester

Debajehmujig Storytellers honoured with Arts Organization Award

By Rick Garrick TORONTO - The Debajehmujig Storytellers was honoured with the Arts Organization Award at the 2017 Premier's Awards for Excellence in the Arts on Oct. 30 in Toronto. Cree artist Kent Monkman and visual artist Brian Rideout were also honoured with the Individual Arts Award

Book review: Two Families

Reviewed by Karl Hele Two Families is a wonderfully refreshing Nihiyaw (Cree) perspective on the Indigenous-Canadian relationship as explained by Johnson.  Throughout his easily readable and engaging text, Johnson explains how the Nihiyaw adopted the Queen and her people, making them cousins with equal rights to share

Fallen rocks at Geneva Park

By Ben Cousineau The Sumerians (who lived in ancient Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq) were the first peoples to “write”. This occurred around 3000 BC. Needing to keep track of their grain and livestock but unable to rely on memory, the Sumerians “wrote” on damp clay tablets with a

Language of Puncture art exhibition features Modern Day Syllabics art piece

By Rick Garrick THUNDER BAY – The Modern Day Syllabics art piece is part of the Language of Puncture art exhibition, which was curated by visual artist Joi T. Arcand and is on display from Sept. 30-Oct. 28. Souliere also worked on a public artwork that will

Ojibway actors shine at ‘Testify: Indigenous Laws and the Arts Collective’

By Laura Robinson Osgoode Hall is 128 years old, and lined with books and portraits representing an elite white and male model of “justice”. The entrance on the eastside, for members of the Law Society of Upper Canada—a colonially loaded title if there ever was one—was the

Artistic projects honour Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women, Residential School Survivors

By Colin Graf   AAMJIWNAANG FIRST NATION – Residents have recently unveiled two artistic projects to remember and honour both Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and residential school survivors at their community centre near the southwestern Ontario city of Sarnia.  Around 50 brightly-beaded moccasin tops, both adult